ADAPTOGENIC HERBS: EXPLAINED


Adaptogens. To Adapt.

Adaptogens are plants that have learned to flourish in harsh conditions. Much like us.

The steely resolve of these pants has allowed them to grow unencumbered for millennia. Intuitively, they twist and turn, seed and hibernate, triumphant over the challenge of inevitable environmental stressors.

Modern science has proven what ancient wisdom has always known: adaptogens work on multiple body systems simultaneously to bring us back to a state of balance and become more resilient to life's daily stressors.

When we call for resilience, they can bring us energy, strength and clarity. 

When we call for serenity, they can support the immune system, fight inflammation, bring calmness and reduce stress. 

When we call for health, they can optimise organ function and nourish the adrenals.

By introducing adaptogens into our daily rituals, we can harness their powerful benefits to help your body adapt. All we ask is that you tune into what your body needs. 

Make them work for you 

Adaptogenic herbs work to their absolute magic when consumed for a sustained period of time.

To receive the maximum benefits, and reach your fullest potential, we recommend consuming your herbs at least once a day for a minimum of 2-3 weeks. Whilst there is an immediate shift happening upon consumption, when adaptogenic herbs accumulate in your body over time, you will notice a larger change happening from within. 

In the meantime, stay present, calm and give gratitude. To your body, for working day and night to keep you healthy. For nature, for providing you with everything you need. For medicinal herbs, for offering unconditional support.

Please note that potions are a more powerful way to consume the herbs, since you are consuming the whole herb. We therefore recommend to start with ½-1 tsp daily and build your way up to a maximum of 3 tsp daily. 

You can safely consume multiple teacups daily.

Please note, if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, please consult your doctor before consuming.

References and studies found here: 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28640972/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19500070/ 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27713248/